Joint Publications with Residents

Research Mentor shown in bold. Resident(s) shown in color.
  1. Espejel S, Eckardt S, Harbell J, Roll GR, McLaughlin KJ, Willenbring H. Brief report: Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells are an effective cell source for therapeutic liver repopulation. Stem Cells. 2014 Jul; 32(7):1983-8. View in PubMed
  2. Lee RH, Roll G, Nguyen V, Willenbring H, Tang Q, Kang SM, Stock PG. Failure to achieve normal metabolic response in non-obese diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice after transplantation of primary murine hepatocytes electroporated with the human proinsulin gene (p3MTChins). Transplant Proc. 2014 Jul-Aug; 46(6):2002-6. View in PubMed
  3. Ma X, Duan Y, Tschudy-Seney B, Roll G, Behbahan IS, Ahuja TP, Tolstikov V, Wang C, McGee J, Khoobyari S, Nolta JA, Willenbring H, Zern MA. Highly efficient differentiation of functional hepatocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cells Transl Med. 2013 Jun; 2(6):409-19. View in PubMed
  4. Ng R, Song G, Roll GR, Frandsen NM, Willenbring H. A microRNA-21 surge facilitates rapid cyclin D1 translation and cell cycle progression in mouse liver regeneration. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar; 122(3):1097-108. View in PubMed
  5. Espejel S, Roll GR, McLaughlin KJ, Lee AY, Zhang JY, Laird DJ, Okita K, Yamanaka S, Willenbring H. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes have the functional and proliferative capabilities needed for liver regeneration in mice. J Clin Invest. 2010 Sep; 120(9):3120-6. View in PubMed
  6. Roll GR, Willenbring H. Transplanted nonviable human hepatocytes produce appreciable serum albumin levels in mice. Stem Cell Res. 2010 Nov; 5(3):267-70. View in PubMed
  7. Song G, Sharma AD, Roll GR, Ng R, Lee AY, Blelloch RH, Frandsen NM, Willenbring H. MicroRNAs control hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Hepatology. 2010 May; 51(5):1735-43. View in PubMed
Data provided by UCSF Profiles, powered by CTSI at UCSF. View profile of Holger Willenbring, M.D., Ph.D.
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