Department of Surgery »  Faculty »  Vascular Surgery »  Timothy A. M. Chuter, M.D.
Timothy A. M. Chuter, M.D.

Timothy A. M. Chuter, M.D.

Professor of Surgery
Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Contact Information

Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, UCSF
400 Parnassus Avenue, A-501
San Francisco, CA 94143-0957
Phone: (415) 353-2357
Fax: (415) 353-2669
Timothy.Chuter@ucsf.edu
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  • 1977-80, Nottingham University, B.M.Sc., Hons, Physiology
  • 1977-82, Nottingham University, B.M.,B.S., Medicine
  • 1982-83, Nottingham University, Surgery/Medicine
  • 1984-85, Columbia University, Intern, Surgery
  • 1985-86, Columbia University, Resident, Surgery
  • 1987-89, Columbia University, Resident, Surgery
  • 1989-90, Columbia University, Chief Resident, Surgery
  • 1986-87, Columbia University, Fellow, Surgical Metabolism
  • 1990-91, University of Rochester, Fellow, Critical Care
  • 1991-93, University of Rochester, Fellow, Vascular Surgery
  • 1991-94, Nottingham University, D.M., Surgical Research
  • American Board of Surgery, 1991, Renewed 2001
  • American Board of Surgery, Vascular Surgery, 1995, Renewed 2004

Timothy A. M. Chuter, M.D. studied medicine at the University of Nottingham, England. He then moved to New York and worked as an assistant professor of anatomy at Columbia University. His first-ever publication was the head, neck, and upper extremity chapters of an anatomy textbook. He was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time when a computer glitch left the Columbia-Presbyterian general surgery program one intern short, thus starting his journey.

In 1990, upon completing general surgery residency, Dr. Chuter moved to Rochester, New York for fellowship training in critical care and vascular surgery. His planned career as a general/vascular surgeon in a rural New England town took a different direction when he started to explore a few original ideas concerning the potential role of endovascular intervention as an alternative to maximally invasive surgery. These experiments were initially funded by Dr. Chuter's nighttime employment in local emergency rooms. Promising results attracted financial support and engineering help from Cook, Inc., a manufacturer of catheters, wires, and stents. The excitement generated by these early successes was enough to precipitate Dr. Chuter into a career focused on innovation, clinical application of new techniques, publication, and further innovation, all at a frenetic pace.

Dr. Chuter completed his vascular fellowship and went back to Columbia-Presbyterian as an assistant professor of surgery in 1993. The first clinical implantations of a bifurcated stent graft took place in late 1993 at selected centers in Australia and Europe. In 1995, Dr. Chuter left New York to work in Sweden as an associate professor of interventional radiology at Lund University. In 1996, Dr. Chuter was recruited to UCSF as the director of the newly formed endovascular program. The other founding faculty member was Linda M. Reilly, MD, FACS, renown for her numerous contributions in the field.

Most recent publications from a total of 138
  1. Hiramoto JS, Fernandez C, Gasper W, Vartanian S, Reilly L, Chuter T. Lower extremity weakness is associated with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels following multibranched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. J Vasc Surg. 2016 Nov 19. View in PubMed
  2. Fernandez CC, Sobel JD, Gasper WJ, Vartanian SM, Reilly LM, Chuter TA, Hiramoto JS. Standard off-the-shelf versus custom-made multibranched thoracoabdominal aortic stent grafts. J Vasc Surg. 2016 May; 63(5):1208-15. View in PubMed
  3. Chuter TA. Invited commentary. J Vasc Surg. 2015 Dec; 62(6):1471-2. View in PubMed
  4. Chuter TA. Invited commentary. J Vasc Surg. 2015 Sep; 62(3):549-50. View in PubMed
  5. Han SM, Gasper WJ, Chuter TA. Endovascular rescue after inadvertent false lumen stent graft implantation. J Vasc Surg. 2016 Feb; 63(2):518-22. View in PubMed
  6. Premprabha D, Sobel J, Pua C, Chong K, Reilly LM, Chuter TA, Hiramoto JS. Visceral branch occlusion following aneurysm repair using multibranched thoracoabdominal stent-grafts. J Endovasc Ther. 2014 Dec; 21(6):783-90. View in PubMed
  7. Sobel JD, Vartanian SM, Gasper WJ, Hiramoto JS, Chuter TA, Reilly LM. Lower extremity weakness after endovascular aneurysm repair with multibranched thoracoabdominal stent grafts. J Vasc Surg. 2015 Mar; 61(3):623-8. View in PubMed
  8. Haulon S, Greenberg RK, Spear R, Eagleton M, Abraham C, Lioupis C, Verhoeven E, Ivancev K, Kölbel T, Stanley B, Resch T, Desgranges P, Maurel B, Roeder B, Chuter T, Mastracci T. Global experience with an inner branched arch endograft. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Oct; 148(4):1709-16. View in PubMed
  9. Chuter TA. Commentary: from bespoke to off-the-shelf: the t-branch stent-graft for total endovascular TAAA repair. J Endovasc Ther. 2013 Dec; 20(6):726-7. View in PubMed
  10. Chuter TA, Quiñones-Baldrich WJ. Discussion. J Vasc Surg. 2013 Jul; 58(1):9. View in PubMed
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