Department of Surgery »  Faculty »  Pediatric Surgery »  Tippi MacKenzie, M.D.

Tippi MacKenzie, M.D.

Associate Professor of Surgery
Division of Pediatric Surgery

Contact Information

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  • 1987-91, Harvard University, B.A., Biochemistry
  • 1992-97, Stanford University School of Medicine, M.D., Medicine
  • 1998-99, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2002-04, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2004-05, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Chief Resident, Surgery
  • 1999-02, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Fetal Therapy
  • 2005-07, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Pediatric Surgery
  • American Board of Surgery, 2006
  • Fetal Treatment Center
  • Biomedical Sciences Program
  • Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research
  • Advanced Laparoscopy
  • Birth Defects
  • Endocrine and Biliary Surgery
  • Fetal Surgery
  • Pediatric Surgery
  • In-Utero Stem Cell Transplantation

Dr. Tippi MacKenzie is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the UCSF Division of Pediatric Surgery and the Fetal Treatment Center. Dr. MacKenzie obtained her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at Harvard, then came to the Bay Area for medical school at Stanford. She did her surgical residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. During this time, she took three years to do research on fetal surgery and in utero stem cell transplantation at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Following residency, she returned to CHOP for her clinical pediatric surgery fellowship.

Dr. MacKenzie's clinical interests include fetal surgery, advanced laparoscopy, and endocrine and biliary surgery.

Dr. MacKenzie has an active laboratory and is a member of the Biomedical Sciences Program and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research. Her research focus is on mechanisms of tolerance induction following in utero stem cell transplantation  and the pathophysiology of prenatally diagnosed diseases, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia and gastroschisis, to identify biomarkers that predict prognosis and molecular pathways that may be targets for prenatal intervention.

  • March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, Basil O'Connor Starter Scholar Research Award, "The Role of Maternal-Fetal Cellular Trafficking in Preterm Labor"
  • American Surgical Association Foundation, "Maternal Immune Responses to Fetal Surgical Intervention"
  • Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award (K08), NIH/NIAID, "Maternal and fetal immune responses to in utero HSC transplantation"
  • California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Transplantation Immunology Award, "Maternal and Fetal Immune Responses to In Utero Hematopoietic Stem Cell
  • Transplantation"
  • March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, Prematurity Research Initiative Grant,
  • "The Role of Maternal T cells in Preterm Labor"
ResidentYearsGrant or Funding Source
Cerine Jeanty, M.D. 2011-
Eveline Shue, M.D. 2011-2013
Amar Nijagal, M.D. 2009-2012 CA Institute for Regenerative Medicine Clinical Fellow Training Award
  1. Nijagal A, Wegorzewska M, Le T, Tang Q, Mackenzie TC. The maternal immune response inhibits the success of in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation. Chimerism. 2011 4; 2(2):55-57. View in PubMed
  2. Nijagal A, Le T, Wegorzewska M, Mackenzie TC. A mouse model of in utero transplantation. J Vis Exp. 2011; (47). View in PubMed
  3. Nijagal A, Wegorzewska M, Jarvis E, Le T, Tang Q, MacKenzie TC. Maternal T cells limit engraftment after in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice. J Clin Invest. 2011 Feb; 121(2):582-92. View in PubMed
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