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Department of Surgery »  Faculty »  Emeritus Faculty »  Lawrence W. Way, M.D.

Lawrence W. Way, M.D.

Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Division of General Surgery

Contact Information

Academic Office:
Department of Surgery
4 Koret Way, LR-101, Box 0475
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, CA 94143-0475
415-476-6359

Practice Office:
Ambulatory Care Center
400 Parnassus Ave, A-655, Box 0338
San Francisco, CA 94143-0338
415-353-2161

Education

  • 1951-55, Cornell University, A.B.,
  • 1955-59, University of Buffalo Medical School, M.D.,

Residencies

  • 1959-60, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Intern, Surgery
  • 1962-67, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Resident, Surgery

Fellowships

  • 1967-68, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Fellow, Gastrointestinal Physiology under Richard P. Durbin Ph.D., Julius Comroe, M.D.
  • 1968-69, Veterans Administration Hospital and University of California, Los Angeles, Fellow, Gastrointestinal Physiology under Morton I. Grossman, M.D.

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Surgery, 1969

Clinical Expertise

  • Biliary Surgery
  • Laparoscopic Surgery
  • Liver Surgery
  • Pancreatic Surgery

Biography

Dr. Lawrence W. Way is one of the prime surgeons that has propelled UCSF to its status as a world-class institution. He has served in a diversity of leadership roles within the UCSF Department of Surgery and the medical community as Chief of the Blue Surgery Service, Director of the Videoscopic Training Programs, and Professor of Surgery to name a few. Dr. Way has also been highly active on a national and international level in surgical organizations such as the American College of Surgeons and the International Society of Surgery.

Dr. Way's unremitting focus on how to best train surgeons is what makes his mentorship elite. While he has done remarkable research and is technically unsurpassed in his chosen area, the development of the surgical house staff has been his top priority. A stern taskmaster on rounds and in the operating room, he sets standards that several generations of UCSF trained surgeons use as a benchmark for performance. Dr. Way is the last court for difficult laparoscopic cases, and his clinics are models on how to be honest yet understanding to patients. Dr. Way constantly looks for avenues to better his students. In this arena, his interests range from the effects of fatigue and safety in the OR to teaching laparoscopic skills in the LARC animal lab.

Dr. Way's focus in optimizing the instruction of surgeons has not been limited to the house staff. He has been a pioneer in training mid-career surgeons in laparoscopic techniques. He has developed a series of hands-on advanced videoscopic training courses with superbly organized lectures and labs that have become justifiably famous, and a credit to UCSF both nationally and internationally. Several of his past fellows continue to proctor in these laparoscopic courses, and never cease to be amazed by how Dr. Way strives to master new technologies while continuing to improve his skills. Dr. Way is a proud UCSF historian who has been part of the university through its ascent from a good regional medical school to a world-class institution.

 

Featured Publications

  1. Stewart L, Oesterle AL, Erdan I, Griffiss JM, Way LW. Pathogenesis of Pigment Gallstones in Western Societies: The Central Role of Bacteria. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 6: 891-903; discussion 903-4, Nov/2002.
  2. Stewart L, Oesterle AL, Grifiss JM, Jarvis GA, Way LW. Cholangitis: bacterial virulence factors that facilitate cholangiovenous reflux and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. J Gastrointest Surg. 7: 191-8; discussion 198-9, Feb/2003.
  3. Way LW, Stewart L, Gantert W, Liu K, Lee CM, Whang K, Hunter JG. Causes and prevention of laparoscopic bile duct injuries: analysis of 252 cases from a human factors and cognitive psychology perspective. Ann Surg. 237: 460-9. Review, Apr/2003.
  4. Patti MG, Robinson T, Galvani C, Gorodner MV, Fisichella PM, Way LW. Total fundoplication is superior to partial fundoplication even when esophageal peristalsis is weak. J Am Coll Surg. 198: 863-9; discussion 869-70, Jun/2004.
  5. Visser BC, Suh I, Way LW, Kang SM. Congenital choledochal cysts in adults. Arch Surg. 139: 855-60; discussion 860-2, Aug/2004.

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