banner

Michael Mann, M.D.

Associate Professor of Surgery
Division of Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery


Contact Information

(415) 885-3882  Appointments
(415) 353-9525  Clinic Fax
michael.mann@ucsfmedctr.org  

Education

  • 1981-85, Princeton University, A.B. , Chemistry
  • 1985-91, Stanford University, MD , Medicine

Residencies

  • Stanford University, Intern, Surgery
  • Stanford University, Resident, General Surgery
  • Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Resident, General Surgery
  • University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Resident, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Fellowships

  • Stanford University, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Research Training Fellowship, Cardiovascular Disease

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Surgery
  • American Board of Thoracic Surgery

Program Affiliations

  • Thoracic Oncology Program
  • UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Heart and Lung Transplantation Program
  • UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute

Clinical Expertise

Research Interests

  • Cardiovascular cell cycle biology
  • Cardiovascular tissue engineering
  • Molecular and stem cell biology
  • Molecular genetics of heart disease
  • Myocardial gene therapy
  • Personalized Medicine
  • Stem and progenitor cell transplantation for cardiovascular regeneration
  • Therapeutic neovascularization for ischemic disease

Biography

Michael Mann, M.D. joined the Thoracic Oncology Program in 2003 as a cardiothoracic surgeon. He received his M.D. from Stanford University and was awarded a  Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Research Training Fellowship through the NIH. Dr. Mann completed his General Surgery residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School and his Cardiothoracic Surgery fellowship at UCSF.

His areas of expertise include lung cancer, mesothelioma, esophageal cancer, sarcoma and minimally invasive (video-assisted) thoracoscopic surgery. He also has expertise in performing cardiac procedures including coronary bypass, valve replacement, and aortic reconstruction.

Dr. Mann is widely admired for his teaching skills and is Assistant Director of the Thoracic Surgery Training Program.  He holds memberships in numerous professional organizations including the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American College of Surgeons, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and the Massachusetts Medical Society. Highly respected by his peers, Dr. Mann was named to the list of U.S. News "Top Doctors," which denotes the top 10% of physicians within a region practicing a given specialty. He has received numerous awards including the Cardiovascular Medicine Award for Excellence in Research, Dean's Award for Excellence in Research, and William Randolph Hearst Endowment for Young Investigators. Dr. Mann also serves as a scientific reviewer for numerous professional journals.

While on the faculty at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Mann founded the Cardiovascular Gene Therapy Group. He also invented  several novel drug and delivery technologies and helped pioneer the application of gene regulation and vascular biology principles to the problem of coronary bypass graft failure. This led to one of the first large scale programs to evaluate the integration of molecular therapy into cardiac surgery.

Dr. Mann's research in genetic and molecular therapies has been widely recognized. He is currently an Associate Investigator in the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute. Dr. Mann also serves as a scientific advisor to the American Heart Association, the NIH Recombinant-DNA Advisory Committee, and to numerous device and pharmaceutical companies.

Research Overview

The Cardiothoracic Translational Research Laboratory is focused on turning a deeper understanding of the complex biology of failing heart cells into a new generation of cellular and molecular therapies that may actually reverse the ravages of heart failure. This lethal condition affects more than 5 million Americans and is already the greatest single economic burden in American health care, yet no existing therapies can either halt or reverse the disease process.

Michael J. Mann, M.D. is the Lab Director. His group is analyzing the molecular basis of the failing heart's response to non-embyonic stem cell transplantation, and these results will provide a framework for the first rational design of optimized strategies for human cardiac stem cell therapy. His group also works closely with the SFVAMC Cardiac Biomechanics Laboratory, headed by Drs. Mark Ratcliffe and Julius Guccione, which has developed among the world's most advanced computerized mathematical programs to model and predict the biophysics of cardiac function.

Together, they are applying these capabilities to better understand cell transplantation as well as the emerging field of surgical reconstruction of damaged hearts. In addition, Dr. Mann collaborates with Dr. Kevin Healy and other bioengineers from the UC Berkeley campus to apply novel artificial materials toward both the delivery of non-embryonic stem cells to intact hearts and the engineering of bioartificial heart tissue.

 

 

Publications

Most recent publications from a total of 28
  1. Zhi X, Gao W, Han B, Yang Y, Li H, Liu D, Wang C, Min G, Long H, Rigas JR, Carey M, Jahan T, Sammann A, Reza J, Wang D, Mann MJ, Jablons DM, He J. VATS lobectomy facilitates the delivery of adjuvant docetaxel-carboplatin chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. J Thorac Dis. 2013 Oct; 5(5):578-84. View in PubMed
  2. Kratz JR, Tham PT, Mulvihill MS, Ziaei F, Ray MR, Hurst JW, Segal MR, Berryman DM, Chu W, He B, Jablons DM, Mann MJ. Analytical validation of a practical molecular assay prognostic of survival in nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. Diagn Mol Pathol. 2013 Jun; 22(2):65-9. View in PubMed
  3. Mann MJ, Jablons DM, Kratz JR. Prognostic assay in small, node-negative non-small cell lung cancer--reply. JAMA. 2013 Feb 27; 309(8):769-70. View in PubMed
  4. Yeh CC, Malhotra D, Yang YL, Xu Y, Fan Y, Li H, Mann MJ. MEK1-induced physiological hypertrophy inhibits chronic post-myocardial infarction remodeling in mice. J Cell Biochem. 2013 Jan; 114(1):47-55. View in PubMed
  5. Kratz JR, Van den Eeden SK, He J, Jablons DM, Mann MJ. A prognostic assay to identify patients at high risk of mortality despite small, node-negative lung tumors. JAMA. 2012 Oct 24; 308(16):1629-31. View in PubMed
  6. Kratz JR, He J, Van Den Eeden SK, Zhu ZH, Gao W, Pham PT, Mulvihill MS, Ziaei F, Zhang H, Su B, Zhi X, Quesenberry CP, Habel LA, Deng Q, Wang Z, Zhou J, Li H, Huang MC, Yeh CC, Segal MR, Ray MR, Jones KD, Raz DJ, Xu Z, Jahan TM, Berryman D, He B, Mann MJ, Jablons DM. A practical molecular assay to predict survival in resected non-squamous, non-small-cell lung cancer: development and international validation studies. Lancet. 2012 Mar 3; 379(9818):823-32. View in PubMed
  7. Wall ST, Yeh CC, Tu RY, Mann MJ, Healy KE. Biomimetic matrices for myocardial stabilization and stem cell transplantation. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2010 Dec 15; 95(4):1055-66. View in PubMed
  8. Yeh CC, Li H, Malhotra D, Turcato S, Nicholas S, Tu R, Zhu BQ, Cha J, Swigart PM, Myagmar BE, Baker AJ, Simpson PC, Mann MJ. Distinctive ERK and p38 signaling in remote and infarcted myocardium during post-MI remodeling in the mouse. J Cell Biochem. 2010 Apr 15; 109(6):1185-91. View in PubMed
  9. Wang GY, Yeh CC, Jensen BC, Mann MJ, Simpson PC, Baker AJ. Heart failure switches the RV alpha1-adrenergic inotropic response from negative to positive. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2010 Mar; 298(3):H913-20. View in PubMed
  10. Li H, Malhotra D, Yeh CC, Tu R, Zhu BQ, Birger N, Wisneski A, Cha J, Karliner JS, Mann MJ. Myocardial survival signaling in response to stem cell transplantation. J Am Coll Surg. 2009 Apr; 208(4):607-13. View in PubMed
  11. View All Publications
Publications provided by UCSF Profiles, powered by CTSI at UCSF. View profile of Michael Mann, M.D.
Please note: UCSF Profiles publications are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Researchers can login to make corrections and additions, or contact CTSI for help.

X